Wednesday, 7 October 2015

Guggenheim puts 1600 artworks online

Guggenheim reports: [edited]

Featuring nearly 1600 artworks by more than 575 artists, the Collection Online presents a searchable database of selected artworks from the Guggenheim’s permanent collection of over 7,000 artworks. The selected works reflect the breadth, diversity, and tenor of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation’s extensive holdings from the late 19th century through the present day, and are continually expanded to include a larger representation of the museum’s core holdings as well as recent acquisitions.

In addition to highlights from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, the Collection Online includes works from the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, and the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. Visitors may browse by artist, date, artwork type, movement, or by several of the major groups of acquisitions that have entered the holdings of the foundation since its inception in 1937.

Tuesday, 6 October 2015

Chameleon Pens

Core 77 reports: [edited]

Industrial designers and ID students need to carry a lot of markers. But now Indiana-based Chameleon Art Products reckon you can reduce your collection and perhaps gain some desk space by going with their Chameleon Pens, single markers that can produce the gradations you'd normally achieve with a handful.

The dual-chambered, dual-tipped Chameleons pull this trick off through a combination of alcohol ink and toner, which react via opposing, specially-designed nibs.


Wednesday, 2 September 2015

Free Font - Cormorant

Font Squirrel reports: [edited]

Cormorant is a free display type family developed by Christian Thalmann (Catharsis Fonts). It comprises a total of 30 font files spanning 6 different styles (Roman, Italic, Upright Cursive, Roman Infant, Small Caps, Unicase) and 5 weights (Light, Regular, Medium, Semibold, Bold).

For more information about the typeface, click here.

Thanks to Conrad Gempf for the heads-up.

Wednesday, 29 July 2015

BauBax Travel Jackets

Entrepeneur reports: [edited]

The BauBax jacket is a multi-purpose jacket intended to keep travellers organised with 15 features that include a built-in neck pillow, koozie drink pocket and iPad pocket, among others. So far, it has raised over $3 million from over 16,000 backers on Kickstarter.

The jacket comes in four different iterations (sweatshirt, blazer, windbreaker or bomber) and ranges from $109 to $129.


Thursday, 18 June 2015


Digital Photography Review reports: [edited]

The DxO ONE connects to your iPhone via a Lightning adapter. Weighing 108g 67mm tall, 48mm wide x 25mm deep, the DxO ONE is small enough to fit in your pocket, yet features a 1"-type BSI-CMOS sensor. That means great low light sensitivity due to the BSI design, and fantastic Raw dynamic range. Combined with the bright F1.8 lens, you'll get far better image quality than your iPhone's camera, with better low light performance and control over depth-of-field.

DxO is a leader in digital image-processing. The SuperRAW feature captures four Raw images in rapid succession, then combines these images in the desktop software using spatial and temporal noise reduction algorithms to generate a high quality, lower noise image. Simple image averaging of four images should lead to a 2 EV increase in noise performance due to shot noise considerations alone which, by itself, is impressive. But there's even more going on.

If there's any subject movement, the algorithm takes the sharpest representation of that subject. Furthermore, the quartet of shots are carefully analysed for motion blur to attempt some de-blurring of the image, which simulates image stabilisation.

Connect the camera to your iPhone, and you're instantly taken to the App store to download the camera app. A couple of steps later, and you're on to taking your first photo. After your app is already installed, connecting the ONE to your iPhone launches the app.

Price: $599

Wednesday, 10 June 2015

Google Project Soli

Airows reports: [edited]
Google is developing a new interaction sensor using radar technology that can track movement with impressive accuracy. It's the size of a small computer chip and can be inserted into everyday objects.

Thanks to Keith Seckel for the heads-up


Thursday, 4 June 2015


TechHive reports: [edited]

Batteriser is a simple metal sleeve that promises to give consumers up to eight times more life from their disposable batteries, AAA through D.

A completely new alkaline battery is rated to generate 1.5 volts, but once its output drops below 1.35 or even 1.4 volts, it effectively becomes useless to many devices. The battery’s chemical cocktail is still loaded with juice, but the circuitry in many gadgets (especially more sophisticated ones, like Bluetooth keyboards and bathroom scales) considers the battery dead.

This is where Batteriser comes in. It’s essentially a voltage booster that sucks every last drop of useable energy from ostensibly spent batteries. So, instead of using just 20 percent of all the power hidden inside of your Duracells and Energizers, Batteriser makes effective use of the remaining 80 percent.

Voltage boosters are nothing new, but Batteriser scales down the technology to the point where it can fit inside a stainless steel sleeve less than 0.1 mm thick. Roohparvar says the sleeves are thin enough to fit inside almost every battery compartment imaginable, and the combined package can extend battery life between 4.9x for devices like remote controls and 9.1x for various electronic toys.

Batteriser will cost $10 for a pack of four when it goes on sale in September.